Why the crisis in Ukraine is really about the future of war and peace

A protest: the past objecting to the future.

A protest: the past objecting to the future.

I find the Ukraine crisis painful to watch for many reasons, but as an American I find it especially painful because this crisis has finally and completely laid bare the utter strategic incoherence of current U.S. foreign policy. Continue reading →

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Tom discusses the Ukraine “deal” on Al Jazeera

I’ve talked several times during this crisis with John Siegenthaler at Al Jazeera America. Last night we talked about the “deal” (or whatever it is) reached in Geneva yesterday. The one the Russian separatists are already violating.

Yes, I know I’m not wearing a tie. I’d just gotten out of class when they asked me to do the interview.

 

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Ukraine: What do we do now?

Image from CNN.com

Ukrainian forces near the border. Waiting.

Criticism keeps us honest, and that includes the critics of the critics. I’ve made it clear, both as a citizen and as a scholar of Russian affairs, that I’m deeply unhappy with the way official Washington has handled the crisis over Ukraine. I have said repeatedly that the administration has projected an air of un-seriousness, of reactivity, and of an overall — dare I use this word — malaise when it comes to foreign affairs in general and this crisis in particular.

But that leads to the question, at least from honest interlocutors, about what I would do if I could change U.S. policy. When asked sincerely, that’s a fair question, so I’ll do my best to answer it.  Continue reading →

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